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 FEBRUARY 2016
and Two Spring Lecture Series

FEBRUARY 2016 PROGRAMS
at Fresh Pond Reservation

Offered by Friends of Fresh Pond Reservation and the Cambridge Water Department

These events are FREE and open to the public. Children are welcome in the company of an adult.
You will receive information on parking when you register. Registration information is below.

 

Documentary Screening: Blue Gold: World Water Wars (2008)

Date: Monday, February 8
Time: 6:00 to 7:30 pm
Meeting Place:
Walter J. Sullivan Purification Facility
250 Fresh Pond Parkway

In light of recent water-related news headlines, this documentary may be of particular interest. This award-winning film explores the possibility of future water shortages actually inciting war. Learn about the intricate and expansive political and economic struggles surrounding water use.

This film also provides interesting and informative commentary on the privatization of water for profit in case studies from around the world, and makes a strong case for water activism and community action.

 
A Walk in the Urban Woods:  Winter Ecology Hike
 
Date: Saturday, February 13
Time: 1:00 to 2:30 pm
Meeting Place:
Maher Parking Lot
      650 Concord Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Strap on your snowshoes (if applicable at the time) and join CWD staff for a fun wintry weekend excursion. While enjoying the snow and seeing the sights of the Reservation, we will talk about how winter conditions shape the survival and habits of Fresh Pond resident plants and animals. We will also keep a close eye out for examples of wintertime animal adaptations, and tracks and tunnels to identify. Families welcome, make sure to bundle up! Please RSVP to fpr@cambridgema.gov. Weather permitting.

Third Friday Seasonal Walkabout

Date: Friday, February 19
Time: 12 noon to 1 pm
Meeting Place:
Maher Parking Lot
      650 Concord Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Join Ranger Jean for a lunchtime walkabout of Black’s Nook.  Develop your ability to take in more of the Reservation!  On these monthly walks from December thru June, help chart the seasonal changes of some of our most active wildlife spots, or simply come to enjoy the walk while we do the work.  We will monitor wildlife by sign, track or presence, make note of the weather conditions, state of plants, condition of water and other non-resources.  Come dressed to be outdoors for the hour.  No dogs please!  Extreme weather cancels.   For more information contact Ranger Jean at jrogers@cambridgema.gov or (508)-562-7605.

 
A Mid-Winter Bird Walk
 
Date: Saturday, February 20
Time: 10 am to 12 noon
Meeting Place: 
Register for location and parking information
 
Many people think that birds vacate New England or hibernate in the winter, but in fact, many birds stay here and are active all winter long. Protected by their down coats, they don’t much mind the temperature, but they must spend most of their limited daylight hours searching for food. We will visit areas of the Reservation where birds are most likely to be foraging.  Beginners are welcome.  We have binoculars to lend and will show you how to use them. We will be outside for almost 2 hours, so be sure to dress very warmly with boots, hat, gloves, etc. REGISTER for meeting place and a cancellation email if the weather is bad.  RSVP to Catherine Pedemonti at friendsoffreshpond@yahoo.com .
 
 
 
Uncovering the Secret Life of White Pines
with your Smartphone

Date: Sunday, February 28
Time: 1 to 3 pm
Meeting Place: Register for meeting location

Enrich your pond-side strolls with new insights to the Reservation’s ecosystems.  Find out what
white pines, white footed mice, wild turkeys, raccoons, green stink bugs and black cherry trees have in common.  Come research the fascinating world of white pines and the natural communities they sustain at Fresh Pond on your SMARTPHONE, TABLET OR LAPTOP.  In this workshop we’ll learn how to identify white pines and their kin as well as explore the numerous and largely unknown relationships between trees, mammals, birds, insects and other plants.  BRING YOUR SMARTPHONE, TABLET OR LAPTOP (all charged up) for an indoor technology group exploration with Ranger Jean.  To register and for meeting location, please email: fpr@cambridgema.gov by February 21.

 

Follow registration directions
included with each program description

You will receive directions and information on parking in response to your registration or inquiry.

To receive monthly email program announcements, send an email to friendsoffreshpond@yahoo.com


Learn about growing Native Plants: Visit the website of
GROW NATIVE MASSACHUSETTS

 

You can sign up for the
City of Cambridge's user-friendly and informative

Recycling and Composting Newsletter
by emailing recycle@cambridgema.gov

Also, check out the Recycling Division's Website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Grow Native Massachusetts
presents
EVENINGS WITH EXPERTS
A public lecture series at the Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway
First Wednesdays, February through May
7:00 to 8:30 pm
 
Native Plant Gardens: Learning by Example
 
Date: Wednesday, February 3
Time: 7:00 to 8:30 pm
Meeting Place:
Cambridge Public Library, Main Library Lecture Hall
      449 Broadway,Cambridge, MA 02138
 
Speaker: Carolyn Summers, Author of Designing Gardens with Flora of the American East
Landscaping with native plants is becoming the rule rather than the exception, but good examples can be hard to find. Come for a visual tour of some truly instructive native plant gardens, large and small, public and private. A diversity of styles, ranging from formal to naturalistic, will illustrate the usage of native plants in both residential and public landscapes. Our tour will travel from Sara Stein’s Garden in Pound Ridge, NY, to the New World Garden designed by Larry Weaner, to the High Line in NYC, and include many others along the way. Accompanied by design and how-to tips, this talk will be valuable for everyone from novice gardeners to seasoned professionals.

Carolyn Summers is an adjunct professor at
Go Native U, a joint project of Westchester Community College and The Native Plant Center. She and her husband recently opened their country home, Flying Trillium Gardens and Preserve, for public tours and to showcase the importance of native plants to all landscapes.
 
 

Restoring Nature's Relationships at Home

Date: Wednesday, March 2
Time: 7:00 to 8:30 pm
Meeting Place:Cambridge Public Library, Main Library Lecture Hall
      449 Broadway,Cambridge

Speaker: Douglas Tallamy, Author of  Bringing Nature Home; Co-author of  The Living Landscape
If we are to make our residential landscapes truly living ecosystems once again, we need to understand the specialized relationships that make plants and animals interdependent. Who better to take us on an in-depth journey into this fascinating and complex world than Doug Tallamy? He will give us detailed examples of these co-evolutionary relationships, showing us how they determine the stability and complexity of local food webs— providing birds with insects and berries, dispersing bloodroot seeds, pollinating goldenrod, and much more. This knowledge equips us to knowingly select plants and to construct landscapes that restore nature’s relationships at home.

Doug Tallamy is a Professor of Entomology and Wildlife Biology at the University of Delaware. His groundbreaking book,
Bringing Nature Home, was published in 2007 and continues to have national impact; it was awarded the 2008 Silver Medal by the Garden Writers' Association. In 2014, he co-authored The Living Landscape with Rick Darke. Doug’s conservation work and science-based advocacy for native plants has earned him much recognition and numerous awards.

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Spring Wildflowers: Ephemeral Beauty with a Purpose

Date: Wednesday, April 6
Time: 7:00 to 8:30 pm
Meeting Place:Cambridge Public Library, Main Library Lecture Hall
      449 Broadway,Cambridge

Speaker: Carol Gracie, Author of  Spring Wildflowers of the Northeast
Our native spring wildflowers evolved in the once contiguous forests that stretched the length of the East Coast and west to the prairies. Their flowering coincides with increased sunlight and warmth before the forest canopy leafs out, and their associations with the early-flying insects of spring are remarkable. Come learn about the life cycles of selected species in detail— and why many populations are in a marked decline due to human activity. By understanding their evolutionary relationships to forest habitat, we can better protect these ephemeral beauties on all lands, and integrate them into our woodland gardens.

Carol Gracie is a botanist and highly-skilled photographer. In addition to
Spring Wildflowers of the Northeast: A Natural History, she has authored several field guides. Her botanizing in South and Central America has led to seven tropical plant species and one genus being named for her.

 

Planting in a Post-Wild World

Date: Wednesday, May 4
Time: 7:00 to 8:30 pm
Meeting Place:Cambridge Public Library, Main Library Lecture Hall
      449 Broadway,Cambridge

Speaker: Claudia West, Co-author of  Planting in a Post-Wild World
Few wild places remain in today’s world, making it ever more important to bring ecological principles back into the design of our managed landscapes. Much more than simply using native plants, this work necessitates understanding plant communities and embracing a new form of design that marries horticulture with ecology.  Join us as we translate the ecological principles of wild plant communities into design and management tools to inform our native plantings. Using the work of several European ecologists and planting designers, we explore the science behind stable and lasting plant combinations—to help you create the landscapes you envision.

Claudia West co-authored
Planting in a Post-Wild World with Thomas Rainer. As the Ecological Sales Manager at North Creek Nurseries, Claudia works closely with ecological design and restoration professionals throughout the northeast— focused on stable, layered planting designs and the extensive use of native plants. ?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New England Wild Flower Society's

URBAN GARDENING SERIES

Our Urban Gardening Series is a set of classes designed to help city dwellers grow healthy, sustainable, and beautiful urban gardens. Led by Society staff in partnership with the Cambridge Conservation Commission, these free classes take place in the lecture hall at the Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway, Cambridge, MA 02138.

 
Water Conservation in the Garden
 
Date: Sunday, January 10
Time: 1:30 to 3 pm
Meeting Place:
Cambridge Public Library, Main Library Lecture Hall
      449 Broadway,Cambridge, MA 02138
 
All gardeners aim to beautify the world. But we also have a responsibility to ensure that our actions contribute to, rather than detract from, the environment. Learn how water conservation practices can help you to create beautiful garden spaces without wasting precious water resources. Instructor: Mark Richardson, Horticulture Director, New England Wild Flower Society.
 
 

Gardening for Pollinators

Date: Saturday, February 20
Time: 10:30 am to 12 noon
Meeting Place:
Cambridge Public Library, Main Library Lecture Hall
      449 Broadway,Cambridge

Native plants are not only beautiful, they are undoubtedly the best source of food for pollinators, because plants and their pollinators evolved together. Covering everything from understanding how to attract specific pollinators to finding the right plants, this class will help you turn your garden into a pollinator sanctuary.

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Growing Plants from Seed

Date: Sunday, March 6
Time: 1:30 to 3:30 pm
Meeting Place:Cambridge Public Library, Main Library Lecture Hall
      449 Broadway,Cambridge

Plants grown from seed have greater genetic diversity, are better adapted to their environment, and are less expensive to produce. In this class you will learn when and how to collect seeds in the wild; how to collect, clean, and store them; and how to sow and tend for them. Emphasis will be placed on species that can be grown easily and without fancy equipment or large investments of time.

Managing Invasive Species

Date: Saturday, April 2
Time: 10:30 am to 12 noon
Meeting Place:Cambridge Public Library, Main Library Lecture Hall
      449 Broadway,Cambridge

Invasive plants displace native flora in home and natural landscapes, impacting the diversity of native plant species and affecting the pollinators and other wildlife that depend on them. Learn how to best control invasive plant species to ensure the health and survival of native plant communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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